Rites of Passage

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Honouring our Life Journeys with Rites of Passage

 

Imagine if all the important events of our lives, and those of our loved ones, were honoured and celebrated together with a community. The richness of our human experience and our journeys through change would be witnessed, shared and supported to bring out the power of these transitions in healing ways.

Rite of passage

The loss of rites of passage

In traditional societies, rites of passage include transitioning into adulthood, becoming an elder, making a partnership commitment, or honouring the life journey of someone who has died or is dying. In the Western world, many of our rites of passage have been lost over the centuries or replaced with generic, commercialised versions such as getting our driver’s license to signify new adulthood or the big white wedding to symbolise commitment in love. This can leave us with a lack of meaning, purpose and integration into the community around us. 

Rite of maidens fire ceremony

Nowadays, rather than being celebrated as they once were, key life events such as a girl’s entry into womanhood with her first bleed are often simply ignored. The potentially positive impact of these events is lost and subverted into more destructive outlets. For example, teenage risk-taking behaviour takes the place of being actively welcomed and mentored into adulthood by elders. 

The loss or drastic change of these rituals is due to factors like colonialism, industrialisation, cultural assimilation and modernisation. Traditional rites grew out of societies very different from our modern ones. Communities were stable and seasonal changes were woven into the very fabric of everyday life, with our survival directly linked to the earth’s wellbeing. People were much more strongly connected to their family members and community since living setups were ‘human scale’ and people stayed in one place for their whole lives. Increased geographical mobility and transience people mean that people have drifted from their roots and from an innate knowledge of our relationship to the land. 

First moon initiation rite for girls

Professionalisation has turned duties which used to be lovingly performed in the home by family members or neighbours into tasks outsourced to specialists. “Caterers, funeral directors, and other entrepreneurs … sell rites of passage as commodities”, in the words of Pamela Nelson in this fascinating article on the return of rites of passage in America.

Both birth and death have been medicalised, with obstetricians and funeral directors taking over these intimate realms of life. Rites of passage have also declined with the rise of scientific rationalisation: the sacred has been driven out of our society’s awareness because of its association with religion.

Smudging with local herbs

 

Revival

Recently, however, there has been an exciting worldwide resurgence of the ancient rites of passages and celebrations of our natural life cycle, particularly those held in nature. This revival is answering our call for deeper meaning, acknowledgement of the personal and communal transitions we encounter in our lifetimes, and a reconnection to the land. The re-awakening of rites of passage is true medicine for the isolation, fragmentation and disconnection so endemic in our modern society.

Rites of passage allow us to bring in the Divine as well as to be witnessed by those who surround us as friends, family and community. By invoking blessings and showing gratitude for our lives, we consecrate the important events, passages and thresholds of our lives and reaffirm our place in the sacred, eternal cycle of life. 

By taking part in an intentional rite of passage ceremony, whether you are the one being celebrated or a member of the witnessing community, you co-create a meaningful story that allows all those involved to move forward and to contribute purposefully in ways aligned with their values and the community’s, confident of their responsibilities. Rites of passage also connect the generations in ways that are often difficult to achieve in our modern society. 

pagan rites

Rites of passages include:

✨ Handfastings, sacred unions and marriages ✨ Land blessings ✨ Baby blessings ✨ Coming of age or initiation rites for boys ✨ Births ✨ Naming of children ✨ Celebration of menarche (first menstruation) ✨ Crone or Wise Woman initiations ✨ Death rites ✨ Last rites ✨

Usually, these ceremonies are held by celebrants who are hired to perform the service. When we participate in these ceremonies in a community, however, we are following the ways of our ancestors, who experienced these events as part of the weave of daily life. At the Blue Lotus Sanctuary, the goddess community and eco-village we at the Temple are birthing into being, rites of passage will be embedded in the society in a natural way. Rather than having to remove yourself from your everyday life to undergo a rite of passage, with the challenge of integrating that back into a very different environment, you will be anchored in a community which honours the sanctity of life transitions with grace and flow.  

All our priestesses learn blueprints for initiations that can be customised to fit the occasion and the needs of the participants, including once in a lifetime events. We conduct these as free rituals through the Temple because we believe that they are a normal part of life. Even in the early stages of our community building, we envision holding rites of passage as an integral aspect of day-to-day priestess duties. 

Rite of pasage for young man

In the context of communal living, we will prepare for the natural cycles of life together and hold space to honour them. 

If you would like to have a rite of passage (or Life Cycle ceremony, as we also call them), you can book here to have one held by a Priestess of Isis, free of charge at a location of your choice.*

We are inviting people to get involved with Blue Lotus Sanctuary and help us to fund this vital project, where like-minded people can gather in community living to learn earth stewardship skills such as permaculture and immerse in deep wisdom teachings and practices. To find out more, please go here.

*food, accommodation and, where necessary, travel costs will need to be provided for the Priestess. 

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